Hillsborough Soil & Water Conservation District
Thanks for your commitment to our Soil & Water Conservation District...leading for tomorrow!

What is a Soil and Water Conservation District?

- Advocating for Agriculturalists since 1946 -

History

Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) were originally organized, for the most part, within county boundaries by landowner petition based on a need for soil and water conservation and in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. A close partnership exists between the SWCD and USDA/NRCS (Natural Resource Conservation District). Their mutual conservation programs benefit everybody; and yet, SWCD's do not levy taxes on county residents; there are no fees to users of district services; and SWCD's do not have regulatory authority - all participation in conservation district programs is voluntary. A memorandum of understanding is the basis for cooperation and assistance between districts and USDA/NRCS to achieve "the common objective of helping to bring about the use of each acre off agricultural and other land within the limits of its capabilities and the treatment of each acre in accordance with its needs for protection and improvement. Serves conservation needs at a county level and works in partnership with the federal government. 

The Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation District was organized August 5, 1946 by the people of Hillsborough County.  The purpose of the District is to provide a local grass roots mechanism to deal with soil, water, and other natural resource problems and in preventing problems in Hillsborough County.

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) administers the soil and water conservation programs assigned to it by the Legislature under the Soil and Water Conservation Law, Chapter 582, Florida Statutes. 

Pursuant to Chapter 582, F.S., the Hillsborough Soil and Water Conservation District (HSWCD) has the authority to enter into agreements to furnish financial or other aid to any agency, government, or any owner or occupier of lands, to carry out conservation, development, and utilization of soil and water resources in accordance with state law. 
 

Get started: Anyone can be a conservationist

The term 'conservationist' is a little broad. However, we believe that everyone is able to contribute to our natural resource protection efforts in some small way. To help you get started, you are welcome to attend any events hosted by the HSWCD:

Calendar of events▸

 
 

Board of Supervisors

 
 

Chairman

Mark Proctor

[Bio]

 
 
 

 
 
 

Vice Chair

Kim O'Connor

[Bio]

 
 
 

 
 
 

Treasurer

Michael Hepburn

[Bio]